Here’s that Brachiosaurus altithorax skeleton you ordered

August 30, 2013

FMNH Brachiosaurus mount lateral

Here’s the mounted skeleton of Brachiosaurus altithorax outside the Field Museum in Chicago, based on the holotype FMNH P25107, with missing parts filled in from the mounted Giraffatitan brancai MB.R.2181 at the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin. To see it with humans and other animals for scale, go here.

FMNH Brachiosaurus mount lateral - silhouette

And here’s the same thing in silhouette. It may be informative to compare this to the very different silhouette of the mounted Rapetosaurus krausei, also at the Field Museum.

I’m putting these up so they can be used. Like everything on this blog, these images are released under the CC BY license, so you can do with them what you like as long as you credit us. Go nuts!

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6 Responses to “Here’s that Brachiosaurus altithorax skeleton you ordered”


  1. thanks, Mike – I really need to go there, digitize it, then create a fixed version in which the poor animal’s shoulder girdle doesn’t choke it ;)


  2. Great stuff, thanks for posting these!

    Since you both have written a fair bit about copyright in the past year, a quick question on using the image: do you know if the Field Museum can/does claim copyright of the mount, and images that reproduce it?

  3. Mike Taylor Says:

    Hmm, that’s a good question. We know that the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin explicitly allows you to do what the heck you like with photos of its material so long as you credit them — awesome! — and the the Natural History Museum in London tends to be less permissive, though see Credit where it’s due. The Field Museum has a policy that seems cool with all non-commercial uses, but not with commercial ones. So I guess that may mean we can’t make Matt’s images CC By. Bummer.


  4. […] having posted a ventral-view photo of the airport mount that clearly shows the twelve dorsals and a lateral-view photo of the museum mount that clearly shows […]


  5. […] reading. I didn’t have a Giraffatitan that was sufficiently distortion-free, so I used my old trusty Brachiosaurus. The vertebra you see there next to Mike and next to the neck of Brachiosaurus is BYU 9024, the […]


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