The Field Museum’s photo-archives tumblr, featuring: airbrushing dorsals

June 4, 2014

In recent photo posts on the mounted Brachiosaurus skeleton and its bones in the ground, I’ve lamented that the Field Museum’s online photo archive is so unhelpful: for example, if it has a search facility, I’ve not been able to find it.

But the good news is that there’s a Field Museum Photo Archives tumblr. Its coverage is of course spotty, but it gives us at least some chance of finding useful brachiosaur images. Like this one of the sixth presacral vertebra (i.e. probably D7 in a column of 12 dorsals):

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It’s instructive to compare that with Riggs’s (1904: plate LXXII) illustration of the same vertebra in the same aspect, in which he almost literally airbrushed out the jigsaw-puzzle complexity of the preserved bone surface:

Riggs1904-plate-LXXII-presacral-6.right-lateral

 

More disturbing still, compare that old photograph with my own (terrible) 2005 photo of the same vertebra:

dscn1404-rotated-cropped-enhanced

It looks very much as though the vertebra itself — not just Riggs’s illustration — has been “improved” since the older photo was taken exactly a century earlier in 1905. This is a constant problem when dealing with old fossils.

Here are three more interesting photos from the Tumblr. First, the Brachiosaurus fossils in the field:

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This is evidently from later in the excavation process than the previous photo of this area, since much of the material is now jacketed. That’s the femur in front of shot, here seen in anteromedial view, with the top towards the right.

Next up, this photo purports to be “Thirteen men including Security Guard unloading dorsal vertebrae of type specimen Brachiosaurus fossil”:

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But in fact it’s not Brachiosaurus — the neural spines are too tall and slender. I am pretty sure this is Riggs’s Apatosaurus — the rightmost dorsal has that distinctive notch on the dorsal aspect of the neural spine. And indeed, checking his monograph on that specimen (Riggs 1903: plate XLVI), I see that its dorsals were distorted in this way, and that the front-centre vert is a fine match for its D10.

Finally, there’s this one of the prep room:

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On the far left, we have the still-jacketed Brachiosaurus femur; next to it stands Harold W. Menke, who discovered the fossil; and to his right is Elmer S. Riggs, who wrote the description.

Those are all the Brachiosaurus-related images I’ve been able to find on the tumblr. But do let me know if you find any others.

References

  • Riggs, Elmer S. 1903. Structure and relationships of opisthocoelian dinosaurs. Part I: Apatosaurus Marsh. Field Columbian Museum, Geological Series 2:165-196.
  • Riggs, Elmer S. 1904. Structure and relationships of opisthocoelian dinosaurs. Part II, the Brachiosauridae. Field Columbian Museum, Geological Series 2:229-247.

 

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5 Responses to “The Field Museum’s photo-archives tumblr, featuring: airbrushing dorsals”

  1. Kenneth Carpenter Says:

    Mike,
    There was a time when vertebrates fossils were painted to make them look uniform and hide the blemishes. It was assumed that people wanted to see “perfect” or beautiful fossils, rather than what was really there (or not there). Most likely that is what you are seeing in your photo of the vertebra.
    Ken


  2. i just wanna come through and give big respect to Mike. the sustained barrage of awesome posts you’ve put out in the past few weeks is strait stompin!!!!!! BRACHIOSAURS FOREVER!!!!!!

  3. John Scanlon, FCD Says:

    I’m reminded of Barbour’s 1890 extended rant about Marsh being a big fat lying liar in plaster’n’paint (American Naturalist 24:388-400).

  4. Mike Taylor Says:

    Excellent point! You can read Barbour’s paper here.

  5. sublunary Says:

    Wow… it’s pretty amazing that that got published in a journal.


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