Today for the first time I saw Saegusa and Ikeda’s (2014) new monograph describing the Japanese titanosauriform Tambatitanis amicitiae. I’ve not yet had a chance to read the paper — well, it’s 65 pages long — but it certainly looks like they’ve done a nice, comprehensive job on a convincing new taxon represented by good material: teeth, braincase, dentary, atlas, and as-yet unprepared fragmentary cervical, fragmentary dorsals, sacral spines, some nice caudals, some ribs and chevrons, and pubis and ilium.

What catches the eye immediately is the bizarre forward-curved neural spines of the anterior caudals:

Saegusa and Ikeda (2104: fig. 8): Tambatitanis amicitiae gen. et sp. nov., holotype (MNHAH D-1029280). A, Cd2–Cd11 in right lateral view. B, Cdx1–Cdx2 in right lateral view.

Saegusa and Ikeda (2104: fig. 8): Tambatitanis amicitiae gen. et sp. nov., holotype (MNHAH D-1029280). A, Cd2–Cd11 in right lateral view. B, Cdx1–Cdx2 in right lateral view.

Here’s the third caudal in detail. (The first is fragmentary, and the second has some minor reconstruction near the tip of the spine which sceptical readers might think is covering up a misconstruction):

Saegusa and Ikeda (2014: fig. 11): Tambatitanis amicitiae gen. et sp. nov., holotype (MNHAH D-1029280). A–F, stereopairs of Cd3. A, right lateral view. B, left lateral view of the neural spine. C, anterior view. D, posterior view. E, dorsal view. F, ventral view. G, CT slices through the neural spine of Cd3, part corresponding to the matrix that filling the internal chamber is removed from the image. Greek letters in B and D indicate the position of CT slices shown in G. Scale bar = 10cm.

Saegusa and Ikeda (2014: fig. 11): Tambatitanis amicitiae gen. et sp. nov., holotype (MNHAH D-1029280). A–F, stereopairs of Cd3. A, right lateral view. B, left lateral view of the neural spine. C, anterior view. D, posterior view. E, dorsal view. F, ventral view. G, CT slices through the neural spine of Cd3, part corresponding to the matrix that filling the internal chamber is removed from the image. Greek letters in B and D indicate the position of CT slices shown in G. Scale bar = 10cm.

And here is the right-lateral view in close-up:

Saegusa and Ikeda (2014: fig. 11): Tambatitanis amicitiae gen. et sp. nov., holotype (MNHAH D-1029280) in right lateral view.

Saegusa and Ikeda (2014: fig. 11): Tambatitanis amicitiae gen. et sp. nov., holotype (MNHAH D-1029280) in right lateral view.

A phylogenetic analysis based on that of D’Emic (2012) recovers the new taxon in a polytomy with the Euhelopus clade that’s going to need a new name pretty soon, since it keeps growing and can’t be called Euhelopodidae for historical reasons: [that should probably be called Euhelopodidae: see discussion in comments]:

Saegusa and Ikeda (2014: fig. 23): Phylogenetic relationships of the titanosauriform sauropod Tambatitanis amicitiae gen. et sp. nov. from the Lower Cretaceous Sasayama Group of Tamba, Hyogo, Japan produced using the matrix of D'Emic (2012) with the addition of Tambatitanis. The final matrix, including 29 taxa and 119 characters, was analyzed in PAUP* 4.0b10. Left side, strict consensus of 81 most parsimonious trees (length = 207; CI = 0.609; RI = 0.8010; RC = 0.489), figures below nodes are decay indices. Right side, 50% majority rule consensus, figures above and below nodes represents the percentage of MPTs in which the node was recovered (only those relationships recovered in over 50% of the MPTs are shown).

Saegusa and Ikeda (2014: fig. 23): Phylogenetic relationships of the titanosauriform sauropod Tambatitanis amicitiae gen. et sp. nov. from the Lower Cretaceous Sasayama Group of Tamba, Hyogo, Japan produced using the matrix of D’Emic (2012) with the addition of Tambatitanis. The final matrix, including 29 taxa and 119 characters, was analyzed in PAUP* 4.0b10. Left side, strict consensus of 81 most parsimonious trees (length = 207; CI = 0.609; RI = 0.8010; RC = 0.489), figures below nodes are decay indices. Right side, 50% majority rule consensus, figures above and below nodes represents the percentage of MPTs in which the node was recovered (only those relationships recovered in over 50% of the MPTs are shown).

Nice to see that new sauropods just keep on rolling out of the ground faster than we can blog about them!

References

  • D’Emic, Michael D. 2012. The early evolution of titanosauriform sauropod dinosaurs. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 166:624-671.
  • Saegusa, Haruo, and Tadahiro Ikeda. 2014. A new titanosauriform sauropod (Dinosauria: Saurischia) from the Lower Cretaceous of Hyogo, Japan. Zootaxa 3848(1):1-66. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.3848.1.1

Illustration talk slide 51

Here’s a working version of that link.

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Working link.

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Working links:

The rest of this series.

Reference

  • Powell, Jaime E.  2003.  Revision of South American Titanosaurid dinosaurs: palaeobiological, palaeobiogeographical and phylogenetic aspects.  Records of the Queen Victoria Museum 111: 1-94.

Illustration talk slide 19

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This whole section, including the title, is mostly swiped from Mike’s Tutorial 17.

Other posts in this series are here.

Papers referenced in these slides:

“Look at all the things you’ve done for me
Opened up my eyes,
Taught me how to see,
Notice every tree.”

So sings Dot in Move On, the climactic number of Stephen Sondheim’s Pulitzer Prize-winning music Sunday in the Park with George, which on the surface is about the post-impressionist painter Georges Seurat, but turns out to be a study of obsession and creativity.

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Un dimanche après-midi à l’Île de la Grande Jatte – 1884 [A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte – 1884]

“Taught me how to see”? What kind of talk is that? One the surface, it seems silly — we all know how to see. We do it constantly, without thinking. Yet it’s something that artists talk about all the time. And anyone who’s sat down and seriously tried to paint or draw something will have some understanding of what the phrase means. We have such strong implicit ideas of what things look like that we tend to reproduce what we “know” is there rather than what’s actually there. Like I said, we see without thinking.

In fact, the psychology of perception is complicated and sophisticated, and the brain does an extraordinary amount of filtering of the visual signals we get, to save us the bother of having to consciously process way too much data. This is a whole scientific field of its own, and I’m going to avoid saying very much about it for fear of making a fool of myself — as scientists so often do when wandering outside their own field. But I think it’s fair to say that we all have a tendency to see what we expect to see.

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Phylogeny of Sauropoda, strict consensus of most parsimonious trees according to Wilson (2002:fig. 13a)

In the case of sauropods, this tendency has meant that we’ve all been startlingly bad at seeing pneumaticity in the caudal vertebrae of sauropods. Because the literature has trained us to assume it’s not there. For example, in the two competing sauropod phylogenies that dominated the 2000s, both Wilson (2002) and Upchurch et al. (2004) scored caudal pneumaticity as very rare: Wilson’s character 119, “Anterior caudal centra, pneumatopores (pleurocoels)”, was scored 1 only for Diplodocus and Barosaurus; and  Upchurch et al. (2004:286) wrote that “A few taxa (Barosaurus, Diplodocus, and Neuquensaurus) have pleurocoel-like openings in the lateral surfaces of the cranial [caudal] centra that lead into complex internal chambers”. That’s all.

And that’s part of the reason that every year since World War II, a million people have walked right past the awesome mounted brachiosaur in the Museum Für Naturkunde Berlin without noticing that it has pneumatic caudals. After all, we all knew that brachiosaur caudals were apneumatic.

But in my 2005 Progressive Palaeontology talk about upper limits on the mass of land animals estimated through the articular area of limb-bone cartilage, I included this slide that shows how much bigger the acetabulum of Giraffatitan is than the femoral head that it houses:

Screenshot from 2014-01-24 17:30:30

And looking at that picture made me wonder: those dark areas on the sides of the first few caudals (other than the first, which is a very obvious plaster model) certainly look pneumatic.

Then a few years later, I was invited to give a talk at the Museum Für Naturkunde Berlin itself, on the subject “Brachiosaurus brancai is not Brachiosaurus“. (This of course was drawn from the work that became my subsequent paper on that subject, Taylor 2009) And as I was going through my photos to prepare the slides of that talk, I thought to myself: darn it, yes, it does have pneumatic caudals!

So I threw this slide into the talk, just in passing:

Screenshot from 2014-01-24 17:32:06

Those photos were pretty persuasive; and a closer examination of the specimen on that same trip was to prove conclusive.

Meanwhile …

Earlier in 2009, I’d been in Providence, Rhode Island, with my Index Data colleagues. I’d managed to carve a day out of the schedule to hope along the coast to the Yale Peabody Museum in New Haven, Connecticut. My main goal was to examine the cervicals of the mounted Apatosaurus (= “Brontosaurus“) excelsus holotype (although it was also on that same trip that I first saw the Barosaurus holotype material that we’ve subsequently published a preprint on).

The Brontosaurus cervicals turned out to be useless, being completely encased in plaster “improvements” so that you can’t tell what’s real and what’s not. hopefully one day they’ll get the funding they want to take that baby down off its scaffold and re-prep the material.

But since I had the privilege of spending quality time with such an iconic specimen, it would have been churlish not to look at the rest of it. And lo and behold, what did I see when I looked at the tail but more pneumaticity that we thought we knew wasn’t there!

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 10).

An isolated pneumatic fossa is present on the right side of caudal vertebra 13 in Apatosaurus excelsus holotype YPM 1980. The front of the vertebra and the fossa are reconstructed, but enough of the original fossil is visible to show that the feature is genuine. (Wedel and Taylor 2013b: Figure 10).

What does this mean? Do other Giraffatitan and Apatosaurus specimens have pneumatic tails? How pervasive is the pneumaticity? What are the palaeobiological implications?

Stay tuned! All will be revealed in Matt’s next post (or, if you can’t wait, in our recent PLOS ONE paper, Wedel and Taylor 2013b)!

References

A few bits and pieces about the PLOS Collection on sauropod gigantism that launched yesterday.

2013-10-29-SauropodEbook1-thumb

First, there’s a nice write-up of one of our papers (Wedel and Taylor 2013b on pneumaticity in sauropod tails) in the Huffington Post today. It’s the work of PLOS blogger Brad Balukjian, a former student of Matt’s from Berkeley days. The introduction added by the PLOS blogs manager is one of those where you keep wanting to interrupt, “Well, actually it’s not quite like that …” but the post itself, once it kicks in, is good. Go read it.

Brad also has a guest-post on Discover magazine’s Crux blog: How Brachiosaurus (and Brethren) Became So Gigantic. He gives an overview of the sauropod gigantism collection as a whole. Well worth a read to get your bearings on the issue of sauropod gigantism in general, and the new collection in particular.

PLOS’s own community blog EveryONE also has its own brief introduction to the collection.

And PLOS and PeerJ editor Andy Farke, recently in these pages because of his sensational juvenile Parasaurolophus paper, contributes his own overview of the collection, How Big? How Tall? And…How Did It Happen?

Finally, if you’re at SVP, go and pick up your free copy of the collection. Matt was somehow under the impression that the PLOS USB drives with the sauropod gigantism collection would be distributed with the conference packet when people registered. In fact, people have to go by the PLOS table in the exhibitor area (booth 4 in the San Diego ballroom) to pick them up. There are plenty of them, but apparently a lot of people don’t know that they can get them.

References

This is an exciting day: the new PLOS Collection on sauropod gigantism is published to coincide with the start of this year’s SVP meeting! Like all PLOS papers, the contents are free to the world: free to read and to re-use.  (What is a Collection? It’s like an edited volume, but free online instead of printed on paper.)

There are fourteen papers in the new Collection, encompassing neck posture (yay!), nutrition (finally putting to bed the Nourishing Vomit Of Eucamerotus hypothesis), locomotion, physiology and evolutionary ecology. Lots every sauropod-lover to enjoy.

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Taylor and Wedel (2013c: Figure 12). CT slices from fifth cervical vertebrae of Sauroposeidon. X-ray scout image and three posterior-view CT slices through the C5/C6 intervertebral joint in Sauroposeidon OMNH 53062. In the bottom half of figure, structures from C6 are traced in red and those from C5 are traced in blue. Note that the condyle of C6 is centered in the cotyle of C5 and that the right zygapophyses are in articulation.

Matt and I are particularly excited that we have two papers in this collection: Taylor and Wedel (2013c) on intervertebral cartilage in necks, and Wedel and Taylor (2013b) on pneumaticity in the tails of (particularly) Giraffatitan and Apatosaurus. So we have both ends of the animal covered. It also represents a long-overdue notch on our bed-post: for all our pro-PLOS rhetoric, this is the first time either of has had a paper published in a PLOS journal.

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 4). Giraffatitan brancai tail MB.R.5000 (‘Fund no’) in right lateral view. Dark blue vertebrae have pneumatic fossae on both sides, light blue vertebrae have pneumatic fossae only on the right side, and white vertebrae have no pneumatic fossae on either side. The first caudal vertebra (hatched) was not recovered and is reconstructed in plaster.

It’s a bit of a statistical anomaly that after a decade of collaboration in which there was never a Taylor & Wedel or Wedel & Taylor paper, suddenly we have five of them out in a single year (including the Barosaurus preprint, which we expect to eventually wind up as Taylor and Wedel 2014). Sorry about the alphabet soup.

Since Matt is away at SVP this week, I’ll be blogging mostly about the Taylor and Wedel paper this week. When Matt returns to civilian life, the stage should be clear for him to blog about pneumatic caudals.

Happy days!

References

Snoozing brontosaur by Bakker

From The Dinosaur Heresies.

Part 1.

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