TMNT Turtles in Time cover

So, this is on the shelves right now. Underage anthropomorphic martial chelonian cargo notwithstanding, the Triceratops on the cover is pretty standard.

TMNH Turtles in Time hell yeah Triceratops

The one on the inside is much less so. Or, at least it would have been up until a couple of years ago. Apparently, dinos that are All-Yesterdays-ed out are a pop culture Thing now.

TMNT Turtles in Time hell yeah T-rex

I’m quite taken with this decidedly un-shrink-wrapped T. rex. But then I would be, wouldn’t I? He’s a big guy with a beard who’s interested in turtles–he’s about one spatial dimension away from being me.

So anyway, if you dig on dinos, you might want to pick this one up. Kudos to cover artist David Petersen for rocking it old school, and to interior artist Ross Campbell for going next-gen.

Immediate Update: Arf, about 60 seconds after hitting “publish”, I realized that those rascals at Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs had gotten here first. Go read their much better post, and then kiss your productive time away as you get sucked into whatever cool stuff they’ve been posting on lately. Seriously, be careful over there.

Get your red/cyan anaglyph glasses on, and feast your eyes:

xenoposeidon--nhm-r2095--left-lateral--anaglyph

Click through for stupidly high resolution.

Those of you who are still too cheap to have sprung 99¢ for a pair of glasses, you can make do with this grossly inferior wigglegram:

xenoposeidon--nhm-r2095--left-lateral--wigglegram

JZool paleoethology special issue

Got this in my inbox this morning. I presume this means that the 30 days start now. But if you’re interested in this stuff, don’t tarry.

And you should be interested in this stuff. This volume brings together some very active and knowledgeable researchers–including our fellow SV-POW!sketeer, Darren Naish, and sometime coauthor Dave Hone–writing on a broad range of interesting topics under the umbrella of behavior.

Here’s the link.

Marble Mountains trilobites

 

These animals experienced days less than 23 hours long, and years with close to 400 days.

Check out this beautiful Lego Diplodocus:

10954093715_c4c7fe19ec_k-crop

(Click through for the full image at full size.)

I particularly like the little touch of having of bunch of Lego Victorian gentleman scientists clustered around it, though they’re probably a bit too big for the skeleton.

This is the work of MolochBaal, and all rights are reserved. You can see five more views of this model in his Flickr gallery. I especially admire how he’s managed to get the vertebral transitions pretty smooth, the careful use of separate radius/ulna and tibia/fibula, and the use of a transparent brick in the skull to represent the antorbital fenestra.

The forefeet are wrong — their toes should not be splayed out — but you can’t blame MolochBaal for that, as he was copying the mounted CM 84/94 cast in the Madrid museum.

 

We feature a lot of Brian Engh’s stuff here–enough that he has his own category. But lately he has really been outdoing himself.

The wave of awesome started last year, when Brian started posting videos showing builds and suit tests for monsters–monster suits, monster puppets, monster you-name-its. Like this monster-sculpting timelapse from last August:

And this suit test from last October:

Brian even wrote a blog post about how he builds monsters.

Things really ramped up this May with the release of “In Mountains”, the first video in a three-part series from Brian’s Earth Beasts Awaken album (which is badass, and available for free here).

If you’re thinking that the Mountain Monster has some Estemmenosuchus in its background, you are correct–that astonishing real-world critter was one of Brian’s inspirations, among many others.

More awesomeness is coming in July, when the next video, “Call to Awaken”, is slated to be released. Here’s a teaser:

I have even more exciting Brian-Engh-related news, but I am not at liberty to discuss that just yet. Hopefully sometime this fall. Stay tuned, true believers.

 

Emeus crassus mount

In a back room at the Field Museum, from my visit in 2012.

I took a lot of photos of the neck, which nicely records the transition in neural spine shape from simple to bifurcated–a topic of interest to sauropodophiles.

Emeus crassus neural spines

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