Get your red/cyan anaglyph glasses on, and feast your eyes:

xenoposeidon--nhm-r2095--left-lateral--anaglyph

Click through for stupidly high resolution.

Those of you who are still too cheap to have sprung 99¢ for a pair of glasses, you can make do with this grossly inferior wigglegram:

xenoposeidon--nhm-r2095--left-lateral--wigglegram

JZool paleoethology special issue

Got this in my inbox this morning. I presume this means that the 30 days start now. But if you’re interested in this stuff, don’t tarry.

And you should be interested in this stuff. This volume brings together some very active and knowledgeable researchers–including our fellow SV-POW!sketeer, Darren Naish, and sometime coauthor Dave Hone–writing on a broad range of interesting topics under the umbrella of behavior.

Here’s the link.

Marble Mountains trilobites

 

These animals experienced days less than 23 hours long, and years with close to 400 days.

Check out this beautiful Lego Diplodocus:

10954093715_c4c7fe19ec_k-crop

(Click through for the full image at full size.)

I particularly like the little touch of having of bunch of Lego Victorian gentleman scientists clustered around it, though they’re probably a bit too big for the skeleton.

This is the work of MolochBaal, and all rights are reserved. You can see five more views of this model in his Flickr gallery. I especially admire how he’s managed to get the vertebral transitions pretty smooth, the careful use of separate radius/ulna and tibia/fibula, and the use of a transparent brick in the skull to represent the antorbital fenestra.

The forefeet are wrong — their toes should not be splayed out — but you can’t blame MolochBaal for that, as he was copying the mounted CM 84/94 cast in the Madrid museum.

 

We feature a lot of Brian Engh’s stuff here–enough that he has his own category. But lately he has really been outdoing himself.

The wave of awesome started last year, when Brian started posting videos showing builds and suit tests for monsters–monster suits, monster puppets, monster you-name-its. Like this monster-sculpting timelapse from last August:

And this suit test from last October:

Brian even wrote a blog post about how he builds monsters.

Things really ramped up this May with the release of “In Mountains”, the first video in a three-part series from Brian’s Earth Beasts Awaken album (which is badass, and available for free here).

If you’re thinking that the Mountain Monster has some Estemmenosuchus in its background, you are correct–that astonishing real-world critter was one of Brian’s inspirations, among many others.

More awesomeness is coming in July, when the next video, “Call to Awaken”, is slated to be released. Here’s a teaser:

I have even more exciting Brian-Engh-related news, but I am not at liberty to discuss that just yet. Hopefully sometime this fall. Stay tuned, true believers.

 

Emeus crassus mount

In a back room at the Field Museum, from my visit in 2012.

I took a lot of photos of the neck, which nicely records the transition in neural spine shape from simple to bifurcated–a topic of interest to sauropodophiles.

Emeus crassus neural spines

In a couple of weeks (in the early afternoon of 25 June), I’ll be speaking at ESOF 2014 (the EuroScience Open Forum) in Copenhagen, Denmark. The session I’m part of is entitled “Should science always be open?“, and the irony is not lost on me that, as that page says, “You must be registered and signed in to download session materials.”

So here is the abstract for my talk — one of four in the session, to be followed by an open discussion.

Yes, of course science should always be open!

“If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants”, said Isaac Newton. Since the earliest days of science, progress has always been achieved by the free exchange and re-use of ideas. Understanding this, scientists have always leaned in the direction of openness. Science outside of trade secrets and state secrets has a natural tendency to be open.

Until recently, the principle barrier to sharing science has been the logistic difficulty of printing and distributing copies of papers. The World Wide Web was originally designed to solve precisely this problem. By making research freely available worldwide, the Web doesn’t just change how well we can do things, it changes what we can do. As Cameron Neylon has observed, at network scale you achieve serendipity by design, not by blind luck. At a time when the world is in dire need of scientific breakthroughs, the removal of barriers and use of content-mining promises progress in health, climate, agriculture and other crucial areas.

So it’s nothing short of tragic when publishers — whose job it is to make research public — purposely erect barriers that prevent this. The iniquity of paywalls is not just that they prevent citizens from accessing work their taxes pay for. Much more fundamentally, paywalls deliberately destroy the incredible value that the Web creates.

Openness is indispensable simply because the opportunity cost not being open is appalling and incalculable. Publishers must find business models that don’t break science, or they must go away.

The idea is to present this as slickly as possible in ten minutes, in a “TED-like” format. I might try to make a video of it here at home once I have it all straight in my mind, and all the slides done.

 

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