My neck-cartilage angle paper is out!

December 23, 2014

Arriving as an early Christmas present, and coming in just a week before the end of what would otherwise have been a barren 2014, my paper Quantifying the effect of intervertebral cartilage on neutral posture in the necks of sauropod dinosaurs is out! You can read it on PeerJ (or download the PDF).

Figure 4. Effect of adding cartilage to the neutral pose of the neck of Diplodocus carnegii CM 84. Images of vertebra from Hatcher (1901:plate III). At the bottom, the vertebrae are composed in a horizontal posture. Superimposed, the same vertebrae are shown inclined by the additional extension angles indicated in Table 2.

Figure 4: Effect of adding cartilage to the neutral pose of the neck of Diplodocus carnegii CM 84. Images of vertebra from Hatcher (1901:plate III). At the bottom, the vertebrae are composed in a horizontal posture. Superimposed, the same vertebrae are shown inclined by the additional extension angles indicated in Table 2.

Yes, that posture is ludicrous — but the best data we currently have says that something like this would have been neutral for Diplodocus once cartilage is taken into account. (Remember of course that animals do not hold their necks in neutral posture.)

The great news here is that PeerJ moved quickly. In fact here’s how the time breaks down since I submitted the manuscript (and made it available as a preprint) on 4 November:

28 days from submission to first decision
3 days to revise and resubmit
3 days to accept
15 days to publication

TOTAL 49 days

Which of course is how it ought to be! Great work here from handling editor Chris Noto and all three reviewers: Matt Bonnan, Heinrich Mallison and Eric Snively. They all elected not to be anonymous, and all gave really useful feedback — as you can see for yourself in the published peer-review history. When editors and reviewers do a job this good, they deserve credit, and it’s great that PeerJ’s (optional) open review lets the world see what they contributed. Note that you can cite, or link to, individual reviews. The reviews themselves are now first-class objects, as they should be.

At the time of writing, my paper is top of the PeerJ home-page — presumably just because it’s the most recent published paper, but it’s a nice feeling anyway!

Screenshot from 2014-12-23 10:39:34

 

A little further down the front-page there’s some great stuff about limb function in ratites — a whole slew of papers.

Well, I’m off to relax over Christmas. Have a good one, y’all!

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5 Responses to “My neck-cartilage angle paper is out!”

  1. Allen Hazen Says:

    Merry Christmas to you, too!
    … As a dinosaur aficionado, you didn’t mention the paper (in the PeerJ palaeontology collection) that surprised and fascinated me, a mammal chauvinist: two Argentinians(*) arguing that we are going to have to put scare quotes around the FIRST word when we talk about the Austrlian Marsupial “Mole” — they argue that Notoryctes, on the morphological evidence, may not be a marsupial at all, but a surviving Dryolestoid, closely related to the Miocen South American Necrolestes!!!!!!!!!! Or, in other words, that extant mammalia, instead of being divisa in partes tres (us, Marsupials, and Monotremes) are divisa in partes quatuor!

    (*) Senior author is, I think, one of those responsible for the recent identification of Necrolestes as a Dryolestoid.

  2. Mike Taylor Says:

    Interesting! Yes, I admit that I completely missed that preprint — but then of course it’s not on the front page (unlike the ratite mechanics papers) due to its being only, at this point, a preprint.

  3. Mike from Ottawa Says:

    Plus, even though Notoryctes may be none of placental, marsupial or monotreme, it’s still a stinkin’ mammal.

  4. LeeB Says:

    Yes but it does have the decency to hide it’s stink underground.

    LeeB.

  5. brian engh Says:

    SVPOW IS ON A ROLL LATELY!!!!


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