Welcome to our Aquilops gateway page. All of the images are just thumbnails – click for the full-size versions.

The paper

Open access and freely available to the world.

Farke, A.A., Maxwell, W.D., Cifelli, R.L., and Wedel, M.J. 2014. A ceratopsian dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous of Western North America, and the biogeography of Neoceratopsia. PLoS ONE 9(12): e112055. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0112055

SV-POW! posts

Images

1. Life restorations by Brian Engh

Read Brian’s blog post on how he created the art: link.

 

Life restoration of Aquilops by Brian Engh. Farke et al. (2014: fig. 6C). CC-BY.

Possible life appearance of Aquilops. This painting appears in the paper as figure 6C. CC-BY.

Aquilops full restoration by Brian Engh

The paleoenvironment of the Cloverly Formation, with a family group of Aquilops and the early mammal Gobiconodon. CC-BY.

Handling Aquilops by Brian Engh

Aquilops with a human for scale. CC-BY.

2. Photos of the specimen

aquilops_skull2

OMNH 34557, the holotype specimen of Aquilops.

Aquilops with Andrew Farke and Centrosaurus

Andy Farke, lead author on the paper, holds the type skull of Aquilops next to a cast skeleton of Centrosaurus, a typical Late Cretaceous horned dinosaur, in the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology in Claremont, CA.

3. Photos of the 3D reconstructions

Be sure to check out the interactive 3D skull at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History. In all of the following photographs, the model is copyright Garrett Stowe, courtesy of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

GarrettStowe

Garrett Stowe at the Oklahoma Museum of Natural History working on a 3D model of Aquilops. Photo copyright and courtesy of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

AquilopsSkull2

Aquilops, one of the world’s smallest ceratopsians, meets Pentaceratops, one of the largest. Photo copyright Leah Vanderburg, courtesy of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

AquilopsSkull3

The reconstructed skull of Aquilops sitting comfortably inside the orbit (eye socket) of Pentaceratops. Photo copyright Leah Vanderburg, courtesy of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

Aquilops with Richard Cifelli and Pentaceratops

Rich Cifelli with Aquilops and Pentaceratops. Photo copyright Leah Vanderburg, courtesy of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

AquilopsSkullDetail4

Close-up of the reconstructed Aquilops skull. Photo copyright Tom Luczycki, courtesy of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

AquilopsSkullDetail3

The reconstructed skull in oblique view. Photo copyright Tom Luczycki, courtesy of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

AquilopsSkullDetail2

And head-on. Photo copyright Tom Luczycki, courtesy of the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History.

4. Paper Models

 

Aquilops puppet - Alf museum

Aquilops finger puppet. This model by Kathy Sanders at the Raymond M. Alf Museum has a hinged jaw, and it is significantly more awesome than my caveman prototype versions below. You should just build this one and skip the others.

Aquilops cut-and-fold – 2 small skulls. Should print 2 skulls at about life size on regular 8.5 x 11 or A4 paper. Warning: they’re small.

Aquilops cut-and-fold – 1 large skull. Still not very big.

Media Coverage

Almost certainly woefully incomplete – if you know of more Aquilops stories or blog posts, please email them to me or post them in the comments.

Other Blogs

3 Responses to “Farke, Cifelli, Maxwell, and Wedel (2014) on Aquilops

  1. Antonio Dias Says:

    Awesome work! Especially starting from a distorted and partial specimen! But the Quadratojugal? – the crest above the jaw – seems arbitrary, too geometrical? Doesn’t seem like an organic form. I know this is a subjective comment. The fossil appears eroded at that point, but the reconstruction – not the fully fleshed illustration – seems overly simplified there.

    Repeating myself….

    Very interesting and enjoying the access!


  2. […] and the skull of Aquilops, a little ancestral horned dinosaur that I got to help name in 2014 (ditto). Many thanks to my friends and colleagues at the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History for […]


  3. […] may think I’m exaggerating the problem. I’m not. If you look at the Aquilops paper (Farke et al. 2014), you’ll see a lot of ceratopsian silhouettes drawn by Andy Farke. We were making progress on […]


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