The paper

  • Taylor, Michael P. 2014 (written in 2004). A survey of dinosaur diversity by clade, age, place of discovery and year of description. PeerJ PrePrints 2:e434v1. doi:10.7287/peerj.preprints.434v1

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High-resolution figures

Fig. 1. Breakdown of dinosaur diversity by phylogeny. The number of genera included in each clade is indicated in parentheses. Non-terminal clades additionally have, in square brackets, the number of included genera that are not also included in one of the figured subclades. For example, there are 63 theropods that are neither carnosaurs nor coelurosaurs. The thickness of the lines is proportional to the number of genera in the clades they represent.

Figure 1. Breakdown of dinosaur diversity by phylogeny. The number of genera included in each clade is indicated in parentheses. Non-terminal clades additionally have, in square brackets, the number of included genera that are not also included in one of the figured subclades. For example, there are 63 theropods that are neither carnosaurs nor coelurosaurs. The thickness of the lines is proportional to the number of genera in the clades they represent.

Fig. 2. Breakdown of dinosaurian diversity by high-level taxa. "Other sauropodomorphs" are the "prosauropods" sensu lato. "Other theropods" include coelophysoids, neoceratosaurs, torvosaurs (= megalosaurs) and spinosaurs. "Other ornithischians" are basal forms, including heterodontosaurs and those that fall into Marginocephalia or Thyreophora but not into a figured subclade.

Figure 2. Breakdown of dinosaurian diversity by high-level taxa. “Other sauropodomorphs” are the “prosauropods” sensu lato. “Other theropods” include coelophysoids, neoceratosaurs, torvosaurs (= megalosaurs) and spinosaurs. “Other ornithischians” are basal forms, including heterodontosaurs and those that fall into Marginocephalia or Thyreophora but not into a figured subclade.

Fig. 3. Breakdown of dinosaurian diversity showing the most productive ages. The "uncertain" segment represents genera whose age is known only to the epoch level.

Figure 3. Breakdown of dinosaurian diversity showing the most productive ages. The “uncertain” segment represents genera whose age is known only to the epoch level.

Figure 4. Correlation between eustatic level (measured in meters above the present-day level) and dinosaur diversity. A. Eustatic level vs. number of new dinosaur genera per age. B. Eustatic level vs. genus density. Solid lines are best fits for the data. Correlation coefficients (r) appear below the regression equations. Data on eustatic levels during each age from Figures 3-5 of Haq et al. 1987.

Figure 4. Correlation between eustatic level (measured in meters above the present-day level) and dinosaur diversity. A. Eustatic level vs. number of new dinosaur genera per age. B. Eustatic level vs. genus density. Solid lines are best fits for the data. Correlation coefficients (r) appear below the regression equations. Data on eustatic levels during each age from Figures 3-5 of Haq et al. 1987.

Figure 5. Breakdown of dinosaurian diversity showing the relative productivity of the continents.

Figure 5. Breakdown of dinosaurian diversity showing the relative productivity of the continents.

Figure 6. Breakdown of dinosaurian diversity showing the most productive countries. No country not listed here has yielded more than five new dinosaur genera.

Figure 6. Breakdown of dinosaurian diversity showing the most productive countries. No country not listed here has yielded more than five new dinosaur genera.

Figure7-diversity-by-year-of-naming

Figure 7. Number of new dinosaur genera by year. The lines represent best-fit exponential curves for the number of new genera per year, as follows: the long solid line takes all the data into account; the long dotted line omits the anomalously low numbers of new genera during the four decades from 1930 to 1969, before the dinosaur renaissance; and the short solid line uses only the counts from the renaissance era, from 1970 onwards.

Figure 8. Total number of known dinosaur genera by year. The solid line is a best-fit exponential curve, which emphasises the levelling off in the 1930s-1960s.

Figure 8. Total number of known dinosaur genera by year. The solid line is a best-fit exponential curve, which emphasises the levelling off in the 1930s-1960s.

Figure 9. Number of new dinosaur genera by decade.

Figure 9. Number of new dinosaur genera by decade.

Figure 10. Number of new dinosaur genera by year, graphed separately for the two supercontinents. A. Laurasia. B. Gondwana. Note that "Gondwana" in the sense used here includes only the modern southern continents Africa, Antarctica, Australasia and South America, omitting parts of Europe such as Italy and Austria that were part of the southern landmass during the Mesozoic.

Figure 10. Number of new dinosaur genera by year, graphed separately for the two supercontinents. A. Laurasia. B. Gondwana. Note that “Gondwana” in the sense used here includes only the modern southern continents Africa, Antarctica, Australasia and South America, omitting parts of Europe such as Italy and Austria that were part of the southern landmass during the Mesozoic.

 

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