The paper

SV-POW! posts

Coverage elsewhere

High-resolution figures

Wedel Taylor 2013b Figure 1 - diversity of caudal pneumaticity

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 1).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 2).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 2).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 3).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 3).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 4).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 4).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 5).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 5).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 6).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 6).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 7).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 7).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 8).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 8).

Wedel Taylor (2013b: Figure 9).

Wedel Taylor (2013b: Figure 9).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 10).

Wedel and Taylor (2013b: Figure 10).

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5 Responses to “Wedel and Taylor (2013b) on caudal pneumaticity”


  1. […] tuned! All will be revealed in Matt’s next post (or, if you can’t wait, in our recent PLOS ONE paper, Wedel and Taylor […]


  2. […] Reformat for a different journal and send it straight back out.  This happens to everyone.  It’s just part of the process.  My very first paper was rejected; we just sent it back out.  The Xenoposeidon paper was rejected without even being reviewed; we just sent it back out.  Our neck-posture paper was rejected without review twice; we just sent it back out.  As I write this, Matt and I are busy revising two papers that we co-wrote, both of which were rejected.  Any day now, we’re going to send them back out. [Update, March 2014: those two papers became Taylor and Wedel (2013a) on sauropod neck anatomy and Wedel and Taylor (2013b) on caudal pneumaticity.] […]


  3. […] (As it happens — and at the risk of leaving the stadium before the fat lady sings — we should be adding to that tally of one Real Soon Now. Further bulletins as events warrant.) […]


  4. […] in 2013, when we were in the last stages of preparing our paper Caudal pneumaticity and pneumatic hiatuses in the sauropod dinosaurs Giraffatitan and Apatosaurus (Wedel and Taylor 2013b), I noticed that, purely by chance, all ten of the illustrations shared […]


  5. […] were able to spend a day at the Yale Peabody Museum up in New Haven, Connecticut, to check out the caudal pneumaticity in the mounted Apatosaurus (= “Brontosaurus“) excelsus, YPM 1980, and the bizarrely broad cervicals of the Barosaurus lentus holotype YPM […]


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